American Politics

American Politics

Twixt mandarins and mainstream

Many Americans feel their government, the media and other major institutions of American society have been hijacked by aliens -- by people who not only do not share their values but who are downright hostile to widely accepted ways of thinking about many of the critical issues of the day. Political, social and economic elites who, in the past, shared many of the dominant values of society have somehow been replaced by a new class of mandarins, whose values and views are often at variance with those of the rest of society. 

Alexander has vision for us all

Republican presidential aspirant Lamar Alexander was in Denver this week, another in a string of visits to important post-New Hampshire Republican primary states. 

No revolution won without pain

Is Speaker Gingrich being unreasonable in the budget debate? Should the Republicans be more compromising? The answer, in my view, is a resounding "No!" 

It is important for the Republicans to stand firm because the current debate is about new choices, not variations on the theme of more government, more taxes and more spending. The Republicans stand for a new paradigm -- a frontal assault on the bureaucratic state -- not business as usual. Both the President and Speaker Gingrich agree: The issues that divide are about policy, not numbers. 

Six key qualities of nation's best

The American people will choose a president this year. They may re-elect William Jefferson Clinton or select a new president. Whatever happens between now and Election Day on Nov. 5, we are going to have many opportunities to think about what we want a president to be -- and what we want him to do. 

Principle-driven change a new idea

Reporting and commentary on the budget standoff between the Republican-controlled Congress and President Clinton have been interesting to watch -- in the sense that it is interesting to watch a three-year-old try to tie his shoes. Reason: reporting on principle-centered people who are pursuing principle-centered objectives -- such as the House Republican freshmen, who ran on a promise to balance the budget and reduce the role of government in our lives -- is not a natural act for the news media. Like tying your shoes, reporting on principle-centered politics is learned behavior. 

States hoping to restore order

The concept of federalism is one of the major and original contributions of Americans -- both to political theory and to the practice of government. But federalism is not working in America. State and local governments are increasingly viewed as administrative agents of an overreaching federal government. As Nebraska Gov. Ben Nelson said this week, "The more I learned about my job, the more the job of governor appeared to be the job of a branch plant manager." 

Women break ground in the West

For the past month the nation has been commemorating the 75th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, passed in 1920, granting women the right to vote. Since that time, the status and impact of women have soared in business, politics, community life and the professions. 

Candidates likely to broker a deal

Seven presidential hopefuls lined up in Denver on Saturday night to win the hearts and minds of Colorado's GOP activists. Here we are, eight months before the first primary in New Hampshire (or Louisiana or Delaware, depending on how things work out) and nearly all the GOP candidates have fully developed messages and several (Bob Dole, Phil Gramm and Lamar Alexander) already have well-organized and well-financed campaigns. Reason: Most seasoned political observers believe the GOP nominee will be known before April. 

Candidates likely to broker a deal

Seven presidential hopefuls lined up in Denver on Saturday night to win the hearts and minds of Colorado's GOP activists. Here we are, eight months before the first primary in New Hampshire (or Louisiana or Delaware, depending on how things work out) and nearly all the GOP candidates have fully developed messages and several (Bob Dole, Phil Gramm and Lamar Alexander) already have well-organized and well-financed campaigns. Reason: Most seasoned political observers believe the GOP nominee will be known before April. 

Political clout shifts westward

For a long time -- since World War II -- the West and South have been America's most rapidly growing regions. During the 1980s, more than 75% of the nation's population growth occurred in just five states -- two in the West (California and Texas) and three in the South (Florida, Georgia and North Carolina.) 

During the past two years nine of the 10 fast growing states are in the West -- led by Nevada, Idaho, Arizona, Colorado and Utah. 

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Reboot

Reboot!

It’s better to wear out than rust out.”  That is the message of Reboot!  While American culture glamorizes the “Golden Years” of endless leisure and amusement, Phil Burgess rejects retirement, as he makes the case for returning to work in the post-career years, a time he calls later life.

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